in Pricing, Sales, Scaling, Startups

Feedback Easily Given is Nearly Worthless

Ever received a cold call? Ever said the first thing that came into your mind to get rid of the person? Now imagine that salesperson meticulously compiling that feedback into a report. 42% of people are too busy, 30% already have a solution, 15% are driving and about to go into a tunnel and 13% of people are rude. Further imagine a company actually making business decisions on this data, confident in the knowledge that they are doing so on the basis of real market knowledge.

Ridiculous isn’t it? Yet we all do this.

No one likes to give difficult feedback. That’s why employee reviews are hard. It’s the same for customers. They don’t want to tell you that your baby is ugly – so they make something up – just so you go away.

You should always view feedback through the lens of how difficult it was to give.  If the feedback was easy to give you should regard it warily and probe for more. Conversely if the feedback was difficult you should really value it. Someone just went through an emotionally difficult time to give it to you. It has real value – do something with it.

When a prospect decides not to proceed with you, they will typically respond to your request for feedback. However, for the most part they just want to get rid of you and will tell you whatever is easy and end the conversation, not the real reason.

Be suspicious of:

  • You were too expensive
  • We decided not proceed with any vendor
  • Our budget got pulled
  • Corporate rules only allow us to do business with companies in business for over 5 years

Your job is to delve deeper and force feedback that’s difficult to give – that’s where the value is.  

Feedback Gold

  • We don’t think you can do the job
  • Your product sucks
  • Your lack of sales process worried us
  • We think you are going to go bust
  • Our engineering team hates your engineering team

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Phil

“Our engineering team hates your engineering team” – Ha! But it’s also very true, a failing I’ve noticed in recent years, due to my increased seniority in tech, is communication skills in customer facing engineers. If they are supporting customers, particularly if those customers are engineers too, then communication needs to be a priority. Being rude, short, or condescending won’t win repeat business.