Feedback Easily Given is Nearly Worthless

Ever received a cold call? Ever said the first thing that came into your mind to get rid of the person? Now imagine that salesperson meticulously compiling that feedback into a report. 42% of people are too busy, 30% already have a solution, 15% are driving and about to go into a tunnel and 13% of people are rude. Further imagine a company actually making business decisions on this data, confident in the knowledge that they are doing so on the basis of real market knowledge.

Ridiculous isn’t it? Yet we all do this.

No one likes to give difficult feedback. That’s why employee reviews are hard. It’s the same for customers. They don’t want to tell you that your baby is ugly – so they make something up – just so you go away.

You should always view feedback through the lens of how difficult it was to give.  If the feedback was easy to give you should regard it warily and probe for more. Conversely if the feedback was difficult you should really value it. Someone just went through an emotionally difficult time to give it to you. It has real value – do something with it.

When a prospect decides not to proceed with you, they will typically respond to your request for feedback. However, for the most part they just want to get rid of you and will tell you whatever is easy and end the conversation, not the real reason.

Be suspicious of:

  • You were too expensive
  • We decided not proceed with any vendor
  • Our budget got pulled
  • Corporate rules only allow us to do business with companies in business for over 5 years

Your job is to delve deeper and force feedback that’s difficult to give – that’s where the value is.  

Feedback Gold

  • We don’t think you can do the job
  • Your product sucks
  • Your lack of sales process worried us
  • We think you are going to go bust
  • Our engineering team hates your engineering team

Increase your Pricing to Increase Your Sales Volume

Spoiler: Because you can spend dramatically more on Sales and Marketing

As I explored in the previous post – very frequently your price is only a very small aspect of the total cost to your customer. For many IT solution is can be as little as 10%. Therefore a increase in your price may not make a noticeable effect on your customer’s cost and therefore the Law of Demand may have a negligible effect in reducing demand for your product, however it can have a dramatic positive impact on your business.

Worked Example

Startup AAA is selling a product for €10,000 and makes 5 sales a month. Startup AAA has a sales and marketing budget of €3,000 for each sale – so they can spend €15,000 a month on acquiring new customers. Startup AAA’s price is 20% of the total cost of ownership for the customer.

If Startup AAA increase their price by a modest 20% to €12,000. This only increases the total cost to the customer by 4% (since price is only 20% of the cost). While unlikely, this small increase in cost may impact on minorly on demand, however the impact of this extra funds has on sales and marketing can be dramatic. In this example the amount spent on sales and marketing can be as much doubled to €6,000 per sale. With the additional resources that this spend allows, sales and marketing should easily be able to increase the total volume of sales.

So price increases disproportionately positively affect your sales and marketing budget (or alternatively profit) while disproportionately minimally impacts on the total cost for your customer.

It should go without saying that price increases like this only apply if your competitive advantage is not price, but then again if you are a startup competing on price then you’ve got bigger problems.

Your Price Does not Equal Your Cost

Its economics 101 that when you increase the price of something the demand goes down (The Law of Demand). Unfortunately, like most 101 courses, this is a partial truth that needs either further study or practical experience to be useful and as the old adage goes – ‘a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing’.

No doubt you’ve all seen the law of demand used to justify low prices. It is particularly dangerous to a startup as it can be used as logical proof to an emotional decision to have rock bottom prices. We all fear rejection and we emotionally want to do everything we can to minimise our chances of it. So we tend to lower our price to a level where it can no longer be an issue.  

However for startups your price, no matter what you set it at, is almost never the issue. The problem is your total cost to the customer and price is just one small element of this.  Your total cost is a long list but for most startups the largest cost to the customer is the personal risk to their career of doing business with an startup as opposed a known quantity.

“Nobody ever got fired for buying IBM’. While obnoxious, this 1980’s slogan this hit upon a core business truth – not only are we, as sellers, ruled by emotion (fear of rejection) so is the buyer (fear that their purchasing decision will be perceived as a failure). If the project fails because they chose a startup rather than an established player, even if vastly more expensive, their choice will look unjustified and unnecessarily risky to their boss (and everyone has a boss).

There are many other costs that go into the total cost born by the customer and I won’t go into them at length, but they include evaluation, training, support, change control, hardware etc.. For IT solutions these costs can frequently outweigh the actual price 10 to 1.  A 50% reduction in your price may only represent a 5% reduction in the total cost of ownership. Similarly a 50% increase in your price may only represent a 5% increase in the customer’s total cost.

Remember, as a startup, if you are going to be rejected, it is almost a certainty that it’s not your price that’s the problem – it’s your cost. Even if you are told by the lost customer that its your price, it still probably isn’t. Most people shy away from hard conversations and a potential customer telling you that you are rejected is a hard conversation. In these circumstances people tend to use the easiest way to end the conversation quickly – saying your price is too high is nearly always the easiest.

A final thought: unless you are a commodity, you either have a lot of value or no value. Unless you have a lot of value, your solution will never overcome the other costs that have to be borne by the customer, and you effectively have no value. It’s not a linear scale, its binary.

Next Blog Post I’ll explore how high pricing can increase demand rather than reducing it.

Monthly SAAS Contracts Suck

The appeal is obvious – anything that lowers the barrier for a potential customer to sign up has to be a good thing, right? It’s attractive when you are scrambling for sales, any sales, that month to month subscription without a long term contract has become the default business model for young B2B SAAS businesses.  Unfortunately it’s the wrong model for nearly all of them.  Personally I blame the Signal 37 guys at Basecamp for embedding this in start-up culture, but that’s another story.

Why is it such a Bad Model?

  • No upfront cash means as sales scale so does the level of investment required to fund the sales channel
  • Lack of customer validation creates an onboarding bottleneck and high early churn rates
  • The customer is not invested in your mutual success leading to more failed customers
  • Commission modelling and payment become messy leading to salesperson disatisfaction
  • Revenue modelling is more uncertain meaning that financing becomes more difficult especially debt

Caveat – Month to month contracts can work well if there is a purely automated sales channel.

Fund the Sales Channel with Sales or Investment

Imagine it costs you €1,200 to make a sale, i.e. it costs you €1,200 to find a potential customer and complete a sale. Now imagine that you only have €1,200 and your monthly subscription is €100. On Day 1 you spend your €1,200 and make your first sale. When do you make your second sale?

You make your second sale in Month 13, when you have collected the €1,200 to fund it from your first sale

Now think about the exactly the same scenario, except this time you charge a €1,200 annual subscription upfront. On Day 1 you spend your €1,200 to make your first sale. When do you make your second sale?

You make your second sale on Day 2 using the subscription collected on your Day 1 sale. By the time month 13 rolls along you’ve made about 230 sales – a 23,000% improvement over the first example.

I accept this is contrived, however the core message is valid – you either finance your sales channel with investment cash or your customers’ cash and it’s nearly always preferable to do it with your customers’. After all, earning money from customers should be your company’s core competence, not getting investment.

Lack of Customer Validation

If a salesperson closes a month to month subscription, then what exactly have they sold? Maybe they sold a three year revenue stream or maybe just one month’s fee that won’t even pay the sales person comp.  The only thing that’s definitely validated is that the customer is willing to pay for the first month. Should you even regard them as a customer at all? Maybe it would be best to think of them as being on a trial until they have paid a certain number of invoices and are actively using the product. This makes a difference because your customer success and onboarding teams will get frustrated and will rightfully demand that they not be handed half completed sales.

The Customer is not Invested in your Mutual Success

Okay, I’ll admit that getting a months subscription off of a customer isn’t nothing. It’s a lot better than a free trial. But what proof do you have that they are committed to your mutual success? The first month fee is a trivial amount and there is no long term commitment.  No wonder your onboarding team have difficulty getting them on the phone and engagement is weak.

Contrast this to the customer that signed up to a one, two or three year contract – there’s a committed customer. There’s a customer that will call you angry when things aren’t working. There’s a customer that will fight to make sure they receive value. There’s a customer that you want.  

Comp Models Become Messy

What are you going to comp a salesperson selling month to month subs on and what money are your going to use to pay them their comp? If you comp them just on the month’s sub then you’re incentivising them to find customers who are willing to pay a one month sub – not customers that will be with you for the long term.  If you comp them on revenue from the customer as it comes in then the reward is disconnected from the actions you want to incentivise. If you advance comp on the basis of future revenue you create a cash flow issue and de-motivational claw backs when the customer cancels.

Comping on an annual contract is easy, and paying the comp is easy if the customer pays upfront.

Revenue Models and Investment Become Difficult

Month to month contracts have no committed revenue stream by definition. Revenue models have to use average churn rates to calculate the following month’s revenue with ever increasing levels of uncertainty the further out you go. In contrast annual contract business only have to use average churn rates for revenue a year out. Having this contracted revenue stream makes financing, especially debt financing, easy when compared to month to month contract. This is all the more important as month to month contracting needs more financing to fund the sales channel.

So why do start-ups almost invariably opt for the month to month sub? Its because they are afraid to ask for the sale, so they attempt to minimise it. They don’t charge what they’re worth (more on this in a later blog post) and then they split the sale into the smallest segment possible in an attempt to make their pricing irrelevant to the customer – I’ve even seen companies split it into a weekly fee.

What if customers won’t sign up for an annual contract?

If you’re a B2B company with a manual sales process then there is a good chance that you just have to accept that you’ve got a longer sales cycle than you think you have. If you are sure that your potential customer will only sign up to month to month then accept that this is a trial period and after the trial period ends they move onto an annual plan. This division makes it very clear that during the trial period the sales process is still ongoing and you don’t count the client as a customer until they sign up to the annual plan. In this way your customer numbers stay clean and responsibility for the sales cycle is clearly defined.   

Usual disclaimer: Context is king, actual results may vary, etc.